Online ISSN: 2451-4950

Keywords : Pandemic


Increased risk for mental disorders and suicide during the COVID-19 pandemic. Position statement of the Section on Suicidology and Suicide Prevention of the European Psychiatric Association.

Marco Sarchiapone; Jorge Lopez-Castroman; Carla Gramaglia; Enrique Baca-Garcia; Francesca Baralla; Maria Luisa Barrigón; Silvia Bartollino; Julian Beezhold; Julio Bobes; Raffaella Calati; Narcís Cardoner; Erminia Colucci; Philippe Courtet; Lavinia Duica; Christine Dunkley; Laura Dunkley; Ricardo Gusmão; Catarina Jesus; Fabrice Jollant; Alexandr Kasal; Anisur Khan; Philip Jules Simon Michielsen; Peter Osvath; Stephen Palmer; Nuhamin Petros; Mihai Pirlog; Anna Plaza estrada; Pilar Saiz; José Carlos Santos; Alexandra Tubiana Potiez; Christina Van Der Feltz-Cornelis; Tereza Vitcheva; Petr Winkler; Patrizia Zeppegno

GLOBAL PSYCHIATRY, 2021, Volume 4, Issue 1, Pages 4-19
DOI: 10.52095/gp.2021.8114

In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. The Section on Suicidology and Suicide Prevention of the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) wants to raise awareness about the potential increase in mental health disorders and suicides as a result of the socio-economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and of the necessary restrictive measures adopted worldwide to contain its spread. Even if fear, worries and symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress can be considered a natural response to this global crisis, some individuals are overexposed to its potential negative effects, such as healthcare workers, COVID-19 and psychiatric patients, prisoners, members of the LGBTQ+ community, migrants (including migrant workers), ethnic minorities and asylum seekers and internally displaced populations. Nevertheless, social support, resilience, a supportive work environment and other protective factors may buffer the impact of this crisis on mental health. These unprecedented times are calling for unprecedented efforts. Evidence-based and coordinated actions to prevent the risk of increased mental health disorders and suicide are needed. However, most of the data about COVID-19 impact on mental health comes from online surveys using non-probability and convenience sample in which females are often over-represented. For this reason the quality of future research should be also improved.