Online ISSN: 2451-4950

Keywords : Suicide Prevention


Artificial intelligence-based models for augmenting media reporting of suicide: challenges and opportunities

Ramdas Ransing; Vikas Menon; Sujita Kumar Kar; S.M. Yasir Arafat

GLOBAL PSYCHIATRY, In Press
DOI: 10.52095/gp.2021.3037.1017

The sensationalised and harmful content of media reporting of suicide is a modifiable risk factor for suicide and suicidal behaviour. Although the World Health Organization (WHO) has published guidelines for responsible media reporting of suicide to prevent suicide contagion, the uptake of these recommendations across media outlets remains limited due to several barriers such as the motivation of stakeholders, inadequate training of media personnel, and a lack of real-time monitoring by the government. In this report, we suggest that artificial intelligence (AI) based models, can be used to address barriers to guideline adherence and improve the quality of media reporting. It is our understanding that the development and implementation of AI-based models or tools can assist in improving adherence to suicide reporting guidelines. We propose a hybrid model that incorporates steps that can be taken at different levels of the media news communication cycle. The algorithmic approach can help in simultaneously processing large amounts of data while also facilitating the design of article structures and placement of key information recommended by media reporting guidelines. The potential benefits of the AI-based model to the various stakeholders and the challenges in implementation are discussed. Given the positioning of responsible media reporting of suicide as a key population-level suicide prevention strategy, efforts should be made to develop and evaluate AI-based models for improving the quality of media reporting in different national or international settings. 

Increased risk for mental disorders and suicide during the COVID-19 pandemic. Position statement of the Section on Suicidology and Suicide Prevention of the European Psychiatric Association.

Marco Sarchiapone; Jorge Lopez-Castroman; Carla Gramaglia; Enrique Baca-Garcia; Francesca Baralla; Maria Luisa Barrigón; Silvia Bartollino; Julian Beezhold; Julio Bobes; Raffaella Calati; Narcís Cardoner; Erminia Colucci; Philippe Courtet; Lavinia Duica; Christine Dunkley; Laura Dunkley; Ricardo Gusmão; Catarina Jesus; Fabrice Jollant; Alexandr Kasal; Anisur Khan; Philip Jules Simon Michielsen; Peter Osvath; Stephen Palmer; Nuhamin Petros; Mihai Pirlog; Anna Plaza estrada; Pilar Saiz; José Carlos Santos; Alexandra Tubiana Potiez; Christina Van Der Feltz-Cornelis; Tereza Vitcheva; Petr Winkler; Patrizia Zeppegno

GLOBAL PSYCHIATRY, 2021, Volume 4, Issue 1, Pages 4-19
DOI: 10.52095/gp.2021.8114

In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. The Section on Suicidology and Suicide Prevention of the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) wants to raise awareness about the potential increase in mental health disorders and suicides as a result of the socio-economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and of the necessary restrictive measures adopted worldwide to contain its spread. Even if fear, worries and symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress can be considered a natural response to this global crisis, some individuals are overexposed to its potential negative effects, such as healthcare workers, COVID-19 and psychiatric patients, prisoners, members of the LGBTQ+ community, migrants (including migrant workers), ethnic minorities and asylum seekers and internally displaced populations. Nevertheless, social support, resilience, a supportive work environment and other protective factors may buffer the impact of this crisis on mental health. These unprecedented times are calling for unprecedented efforts. Evidence-based and coordinated actions to prevent the risk of increased mental health disorders and suicide are needed. However, most of the data about COVID-19 impact on mental health comes from online surveys using non-probability and convenience sample in which females are often over-represented. For this reason the quality of future research should be also improved.