Online ISSN: 2451-4950

Keywords : Covid-19


Association of perceived isolation and resilience with self-rated mental health among undergraduate medical students in Nepal during the COVID-19 pandemic

Rakesh Singh; Pragya Rai; Madhusudan Subedi; Babita Singh; Moses Chicco Banda Aron; Chandra Bahadur Sunar; SM Yasir Arafat; Sharika Mahato

GLOBAL PSYCHIATRY, In Press
DOI: 10.52095/gp.2021.1392.1015

Background:  The COVID-19 pandemic has devastatingly affected the entire world and destroyed the equilibrium of every sphere of life. Like other groups of people, medical students of Nepal have been facing the conditions of lockdown and social isolation that have arisen because of the pandemic.
Objective: We aimed to see the relationship of perceived isolation and resilience with self-rated mental health among undergraduate medical students in Nepal.
Materials and methods: A web-based online survey was carried out in July 2020 using a semi-structured questionnaire in Google form. Data analysis was performed in SPSS vs 20. Ordered logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the effects of perceived isolation, resilience and background characteristics on self-rated mental health.
Results: Out of 515 participants, 44.9% were male.31.4% reported having fair/poor mental health status and 21.9% reported feeling stressed often due to the COVID-19 pandemic. An increment of 1SD in perceived isolation is associated with about a 5% reduction in the odds of having better mental health (exp (−0.048) = 0.95; p=0.026). Similarly, an increment of 1SD in resilience is associated with about 13% lower odds of having better mental health (exp (−0.149) = 0.862 ; p<0.001).
Conclusion: This study is an early step towards the assessment of perceived isolation and mental health among undergraduate medical students amid the COVID-19 pandemic in Nepal. There is a need to conduct regular counselling sessions and strengthen the coping skills of medical students duringthe pandemic.

Increased risk for mental disorders and suicide during the COVID-19 pandemic. Position statement of the Section on Suicidology and Suicide Prevention of the European Psychiatric Association.

Marco Sarchiapone; Jorge Lopez-Castroman; Carla Gramaglia; Enrique Baca-Garcia; Francesca Baralla; Maria Luisa Barrig&oacute;n; Silvia Bartollino; Julian Beezhold; Julio Bobes; Raffaella Calati; Narc&iacute;s Cardoner; Erminia Colucci; Philippe Courtet; Lavinia Duica; Christine Dunkley; Laura Dunkley; Ricardo Gusm&atilde;o; Catarina Jesus; Fabrice Jollant; Alexandr Kasal; Anisur Khan; Philip Jules Simon Michielsen; Peter Osvath; Stephen Palmer; Nuhamin Petros; Mihai Pirlog; Anna Plaza estrada; Pilar Saiz; Jos&eacute; Carlos Santos; Alexandra Tubiana Potiez; Christina Van Der Feltz-Cornelis; Tereza Vitcheva; Petr Winkler; Patrizia Zeppegno

GLOBAL PSYCHIATRY, 2021, Volume 4, Issue 1, Pages 4-19
DOI: 10.52095/gp.2021.8114

In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. The Section on Suicidology and Suicide Prevention of the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) wants to raise awareness about the potential increase in mental health disorders and suicides as a result of the socio-economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and of the necessary restrictive measures adopted worldwide to contain its spread. Even if fear, worries and symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress can be considered a natural response to this global crisis, some individuals are overexposed to its potential negative effects, such as healthcare workers, COVID-19 and psychiatric patients, prisoners, members of the LGBTQ+ community, migrants (including migrant workers), ethnic minorities and asylum seekers and internally displaced populations. Nevertheless, social support, resilience, a supportive work environment and other protective factors may buffer the impact of this crisis on mental health. These unprecedented times are calling for unprecedented efforts. Evidence-based and coordinated actions to prevent the risk of increased mental health disorders and suicide are needed. However, most of the data about COVID-19 impact on mental health comes from online surveys using non-probability and convenience sample in which females are often over-represented. For this reason the quality of future research should be also improved.

Severity of depression, anxiety and stress among the people of Kashmir, India during COVID-19: An observation from tele psychiatric services

Sheikh Shoib; Sheikh Mohd Saleem; Sheikh Mohammed Shaiful Islam; S.M yasir Arafat; Shijo John Joseph

GLOBAL PSYCHIATRY, 2021, Volume 4, Issue 1, Pages 62-67
DOI: 10.52095/gp.2021.8115

Objective:  The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the mental health and well-being of millions of people across the globe. This study aimed to assess the severity of depression, anxiety and stress level among persons who sought teleconsultation during the lockdown period in Kashmir, India.
Materials and methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out from 21 March to 31 May 2020 in Kashmir, India. A call line was set up for people with mental health concerns and participants who signed up for the service were included in the study. The mental health services were provided by a team via teleconsultation. The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) questionnaire was used to assess the severity of distress.
Results: A total of 293 people were interviewed during the teleconsultation service. The mean age was 37.10 (± 10.54) years, the majority had moderate depression, 125 (42.7%), followed by extreme severe depression, 95 (32.4%). The mean depression score on the DASS-21 scale was 13.52 ± 4.13. A total of 276 (94.2%) patients had severe anxiety following lockdown with a mean anxiety score of 14.04 ± 9.23. Also, 96 (32.8%) of people had mild stress with a mean stress score of 12.82 ± 7.32.
Conclusion: The severity of depression, anxiety and stress was high in our study population highlighting the need to provide critical mental health services. Teleconsultations could be an alternative approach to provide such services in areas with public health emergencies and where medical infrastructure is limited.